Posts Tagged ‘airplane’

You Got To Be Shitting Me Entry #94
December 21, 2013
By FoxNews.com

Sometimes a man just needs a sandwich.

On Sunday, a New York-bound flight was reportedly delayed for more than two hours as the pilot waited for a sandwich to be delivered to him.

Pakistani newspaper The Nation reported that Pakistan International Airlines pilot, identified as Flight Captain Noushad, refused to leave Allama Iqbal International Airport in Lahore until his sandwich arrived from a five-star hotel in the city.

Noushad reportedly stated that he “needed sandwiches at any cost”– after learning that the inflight menu did not include the gourmet treats and had only peanuts, chips and cookies. The pilot continued to demand the sandwich even after he was informed that it could take as long as two hours to get one from the hotel.

Flight 711 from Lahore to New York, via Manchester, was all set for an on-time departure at 6:45 on Dec. 15. Due to the pilot’s food craving, the flight did not leave until 9:15 a.m. — a two-and-a-half hour delay.

Airline spokesman Mashhood Tajwar told The Nation that “management had taken a serious notice of the delay of an international flight” and an investigation has been ordered and action will be taken against those responsible for it.

Although, from the looks of it, it seems to be a pretty open-and-shut case of a man and his sandwich.

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You Got To Be Shitting Me Entry #87

November 15, 2013

By  JOSH HASKELL ABC News

A passenger fell out of small plane and plummeted into the water in Miami’s Biscayne Bay today, police said.

The plane was flying at 1,800 feet at the time.

Air traffic control received a “mayday” call around 1:30 p.m. ET when the Piper PA 46 was flying roughly eight miles southeast of Tamiami Executive Airport.

“Mayday! Mayday! Mayday! I have a door ajar and I’m heading toward Tamiami,” the pilot told air traffic control. “I have a door ajar and a passenger that fell down. I’m six miles from Tamiami.”

“You said you’ve got a passenger that fell out of your plane?” the air traffic controller asks the pilot.

“That’s correct, sir. He opened the backdoor and he just fell out the plane,” said the unidentified pilot.

The aircraft continued onto Tamiami Airport and landed.

Miami-Dade Police tell ABCNews.com that their homicide unit was dispatched to the airport Thursday afternoon to question the pilot. The only people aboard the plane had been the pilot and the passenger, police said.

Detectives are currently at the Tamiami Airport “talking to the pilot to see what transpired before the passenger fell from the plane.”

Divers with the Miami-Dade police department are searching the area where the man is believed to have fallen into the water. That area is between the Cape Florida Lighthouse on Key Biscayne and the seashore so some-where in that section of Biscayne Bay.

The Coast Guard station Miami Beach sent a search and rescue boat to search the waters and Miami-Dade County Air Rescue dispatched one of their helicopters as well. That helicopter has since been called off.

You Got To Be Shitting Me Entry #84

October 7, 2013

By ALEXIS SHAW | Good Morning America

A “very street smart” nine-year-old boy managed to pass through a security checkpoint at a Minnesota airport and hop on a flight to Las Vegas without a boarding pass, authorities said.

The boy arrived alone at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport on Thursday morning, airport spokesman Patrick Hogan told ABC News.

He was screened by TSA officials and then headed to an airport concourse, where he boarded an 11:15 a.m. flight on Delta to Sin City.

The flight crew became suspicious of the nine-year-old’s travel circumstances and called the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police, who took the boy into custody upon landing, Hogan said. He was then transferred into the care of child protective services.

“The fact that the child’s actions weren’t detected until he was in flight is concerning,” he said. “More than 33 million people travel through Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport every year, and I don’t know of another instance in my 13 years at the airport in which anything similar has happened.

“Fortunately, the flight crew took appropriate actions to ensure the child’s safety, so the story does have a good ending,” Hogan said.

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police spokesman Bill Cassell told ABC News the boy was “more worldly than most nine-year-old kids.”

“He was able to get onto an airline where he didn’t have a ticket and made it five states across the U.S.,” he said. “If it hadn’t been for alert airline employees on our end, he probably never would have been discovered.”

Cassell did not know if the boy had been reunited with his family, but said that the boy’s mother, child protective services and Delta Airlines were working to develop a plan to bring him home after the incident occurred.

A spokesman for Delta Airlines said the incident was under investigation, but would not elaborate on the details of the case.

You Got To Be Shitting Me Entry #60

August 9, 2012

By Alexis Shaw | ABC News

Alaska Airlines Passenger's Confidence Shaken by Handwritten Message on Wing (ABC News)

While aboard an Alaska Airlines flight leaving Burbank, Calif. bound for Seattle, Wash., a passenger looked out a window to see a handwritten message scrawled on what appeared to be a damaged area of the plane’s wing.

“We know about this,” the note said. Below the message, an arrow pointed down to a portion of the wing that appeared to be missing.

The passenger took a picture and uploaded it to     social news website Reddit under the name Boeing247.

“The maintenance team for this Alaska Airlines 737 sure knows how to instill passenger confidence,” Boeing247 said. “The method of communication here shows a unique level of professionalism.”

Commentors on the posting weighed in on the airlines’ unorthodox policy, including one Delta airlines operations employee.

“This is for the ground personnel meeting the arriving aircraft (parkers), who are required to inspect the ship and document any damage found on arrival. Marking apparent damage prevents reports from being filed at each station at which the aircraft arrives,” the employee said. “Delta does not do this and we inefficiently file a report tens of times for damage that has already been documented, creating needless redundant emails and work.”

Alaska Airlines spokeswoman Bobbie Egan said that the photo showed a permanent approved trim repair to the corner flap of the right wing, and that the plane was absolutely safe to fly.

“The small indent shown in the photo was reported multiple times in multiple flight crew reports. A maintenance technician wrote on the wing to acknowledge to flight crews that the repair was made, documented and that the plane was airworthy,” she said.

Egan said the airline immediately removed the message from the wing upon hearing about it, and apologized for any alarm it may have caused.

 

You Got To Be Shitting Me Entry #41

January 18, 2012

By Katie Kindelan | ABC News Blogs

British Airways apologized today for an error that left passengers on board a flight from Miami to London in a state of panic and shock.

Passengers traveling on British Airways Flight 206 were about three hours into their flight early Friday morning when an announcement warned them to brace themselves for an emergency water landing because the plane was about to go down.

“This is an emergency. We will shortly be making an emergency landing on water,” the taped message said, played at around 3 a.m. on the overnight flight.

The cabin erupted in panic as startled passengers woke to the announcement and feared for their lives.

“My wife was crying and passengers were screaming,” a passenger from Scotland told The Telegraph.  “I thought we were going to die.”

The crew played a second announcement a minute later, however, telling passengers to ignore the warning.

In reality, the plane was cruising safely at an altitude of 35,000 feet and halfway from Miami to London’s Heathrow Airport at the time.

The flight continued safely to London, where the disembarking passengers were met by British Airways representatives handing out letters apologizing for the error.

The airline blamed the scare on a pre-recorded emergency announcement that was activated in error, according to the Daily Mail.  It was unclear whether the announcement resulted from human error, or a computer malfunction.

“The cabin crew canceled the announcement immediately and sought to reassure customers that the flight was operating normally. We apologize to customers for causing them undue concern,” the company said in a statement.

The incident is the second time in two years that an emergency warning has mistakenly gone off on a British Airways flight.

In August 2010, 275 passengers onboard a British Airways flight from London to Hong Kong were jarred by a similar message announcing, “We may shortly need to make an emergency landing on water.”

In that case, again, crew members quickly issued another message saying the warning was in error, and the airline later issued a statement of apology.

The flight had been safely passing over the North Sea at the time of the announcement.

You Got To Be Shitting Me Entry# 5

March 24 2011

(AP) Air traffic safety is under increased scrutiny by federal authorities following an incident in which two passenger jets landed without controller assistance at Reagan National Airport because no one could be reached in the airport tower.

An aviation official said that an air traffic supervisor — the lone controller on duty around midnight on Tuesday when the incident occurred — had fallen asleep. The official, who spoke on grounds of anonymity because an investigation is ensuing, said the incident has led the Federal Aviation Administration to launch a nationwide inquiry into airport tower staffing issues.

Peter Knudson, a spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board said Wednesday that the pilots of the two planes were in contact with controllers at a regional Federal Aviation Administration facility about 40 miles away in Warrenton, Va.

He said that after pilots were unable to raise the airport tower at Reagan by radio, they asked controllers in Warrenton to call the tower. Repeated calls from the regional facility to the tower went unanswered, Knudson added.

Responding to the incident, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said in a statement that he has directed FAA to put two air traffic controllers on the midnight shift at Reagan National.

“It is not acceptable to have just one controller in the tower managing air traffic in this critical air space,” LaHood said. Reagan National is located in Northern Virginia just across the Potomac River from Washington.

LaHood also said he has directed FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt to study tower staffing at other airports around the country.

NTSB is gathering information on the occurrence to decide whether to open a formal investigation, Knudson said.

Regional air traffic facilities handle aircraft within roughly a 50 mile radius of an airport, but landings, takeoffs and planes within about three miles of an airport are handled by controllers in the airport tower.

The planes involved were American Airlines flight 1012, a Boeing 737 with 91 passengers and 6 crew members on board, and United Airlines flight 628T, an Airbus A320 with 63 passengers and five crew members.

“The NTSB is conducting an investigation and we are doing our own review,” United spokesman Charles Hobart said in an email.

FAA spokeswoman Laura Brown said the agency “is looking into staffing issues and whether existing procedures were followed appropriately.”

It’s unlikely the safety of the planes was at risk since the pilots would have used a radio frequency for the airport tower to advise nearby aircraft of their intention to land and to make sure that no other planes also intended to land at that time, aviation safety experts said. At that time of night, air traffic would have been light, they said.

Also, controllers at the regional facility, using radar, would have been able to advise the pilots of other nearby planes, experts said.

The primary risk would have been if there was equipment on the runway when the planes landed, they said.

But the incident raises serious questions about controller fatigue, a longstanding safety concern, said John Goglia, a former NTSB board member.

“You have to watch your schedules to make sure (controllers) have adequate rest,” Goglia said. “It’s worse when nothing is going on. When it’s busy, you have to stay engaged. When it’s quiet, all they have to be is a little bit tired and they’ll fall asleep.”